5 dish rich in proteins and low in carbs : Pitta-Kapha

Pitta people ask me pretty often what would be an example of an ayurvedic diet that balance the dosha Pitta during summertime and that is high in proteins and low in carbs. As you may know, Pitta people can be very affected physically by the big heat. It makes the fire go up, and the consequences of this excess of heat created sweating, redness, oiliness, impatience, frustration, impulsivity and intensity. The fire imbalance can lead to angriness and combativeness as well.

To maintain the balance of the fire (and also the water element) during the intense heat, one of the best ways to do it is with a proper diet adapted to the fire element which means high in minerals, vitamins and refreshing. The dish needs to fill to calm down the fire, and, as you know, has the following taste: Bitter, Pungent, and Sweet to balance the Pitta/Kapha during the summertime. We also want a vegetarian dish (less meat as possible for Pitta/Kapha, especially in summer), with no excess of soft texture. Because the Kapha needs some « crunchy » food, I kept the dish low in sauce (it is what I like!) but feel free to pimp it with any sauce that balances your elements.

Dish 1: Grilled tofu, chickpeas with green beans

Panned tofu, chickpeas, greens beans, olive oil

Tofu is not a food that you may find in old ayurvedic literature. It’s not mentioned because soy was not cultivated in areas where Ayurveda was developed. Although a lot of people have problems digesting tofu because soy contains at least 15 different proteins that can cause an allergic reaction, it’s however a good protein option for vegetarian people that trains a lot or need a diet rich in proteins.

Dish 2: Paned tofu, green beans, tofu

Cooked kale is easier to digest than raw. When it’s cooked, kale is still making gassy but less. It’s one of the reasons that it’s not recommended for Vata. Because it’s lightly bitter, kale is a good « green » for Pitta and Kapha but it has to be chewed properly to facilitate digestion.

Dish 3: Lentils patties with zucchini pasta and avocado

Zucchinis is one of my favourite vegetables for the main reason that it is very easy to grow and they don’t need too much attention in the garden. Also, zucchinis are pretty cheap at the supermarket. In Ayurveda, Zucchinis are classified as balancing Vata, Pitta and Kapha.

You can see the recipe for the lentil patties here (in French).

Avocados are recommended in Ayurveda for Pitta dosha (because it’s cooling), but also for the Vata dosha (a smooth texture that balances the Wind element).

Dish 4: Lentils salad, tofu, sweet potatoes, green beans

Greens beans, sweet potato, lentils, tofu

Sweet potatoes are recommended for the Pitta because they bring good fibers, vitamin A and sweetness. They are also very good for Vata dosha because they are sweet, smooth and very nutritive. The skin is rich in potassium, magnesium and vitamin A and C.

Dish 5: Black beans, rice, kale, sweet potatoes, beet

Sweet potatoes, rice, beans, kale, beet

Mixing together cereals with legumes is a good protein source. There is a myth that says that beans and rice are complete proteins together, which is not so true… Beans are high in proteins. Kidney beans have 15 grams of protein per cup. Quality rice has all the essential amino acids that we need. All together, the chances that Agni, the digestive fire is filled, are higher with the mix of legumes and cereals.

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Jenny Adama

Auteure de la Bible des régimes et du Petit livre bleu du bleuet, Jenny Solmy a terminé ses études en naturopathie en 2014 à Montréal. Dîplomée en cuisine et pâtisserie, elle s'est toujours passionnée pour l'ayurvéda et les médecines traditionnelles. En 2013, elle obtient son dîplome en Nutrition ayurvédique auprès de l'International Academy of Ayurved à Pune en Inde et approndi ses études à Montréal à l'Espace Ayurvéda, où elle enseigna en plus de faire des consultations ayurvédiques. Jenny enseigne la nutrition ayurvédique depuis 2014.